The Young Composers: Composition's Beginnings in Nineteenth-Century Schools (Studies in Writing and Rhetoric)
The Young Composers: Composition's Beginnings in Nineteenth-Century Schools (Studies in Writing and Rhetoric)
Brand: Southern Illinois University Press

The Young Composers: Composition's Beginnings in Nineteenth-Century Schools (Studies in Writing and Rhetoric)

  • Publish Date: 1999-04-28
  • Binding: Paperback
  • Author: Professor Lucille M. Schultz

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Lucille M. Schultz's The Young Composers: Composition's Beginnings in Nineteenth-Century Schools is the first full-length history of school-based writing instruction. Schultz demonstrates that writing instruction in nineteenth-century American schools is much more important in the overall history of writing instruction than we have previously assumed.

Drawing on primary materials that have not been considered in previous histories of writing instructionlittle-known textbooks and student writing that includes prize-winning essays, journal entries, letters, and articles written for school newspapersSchultz shows that in nineteenth-century American schools, the voices of the British rhetoricians that dominated college writing instruction were attenuated by the voice of the Swiss education reformer Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi. Partly through the influence of Pestalozzi's thought, writing instruction for children in schools became child-centered, not just a replica or imitation of writing instruction in the colleges.

It was also in these nineteenth-century American schools that personal or experience-based writing began and where the democratization of writing was institutionalized. These schools prefigured some of our contemporary composition practices: free writing, peer editing, and the use of illustrations as writing prompts. It was in these schools, in fact, where composition instruction as we know it today began, Schultz argues.

This book features a chapter on the agency of textbook iconography, which includes illustrations from nineteenth-century composition books as well as a cultural analysis of those illustrations. Schultz also includes a lengthy bibliography of nineteenth-century composition textbooks and student and school newspapers.


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