Historical Dictionary of the Dirty Wars (Historical Dictionaries of War, Revolution, and Civil Unrest)
Historical Dictionary of the Dirty Wars (Historical Dictionaries of War, Revolution, and Civil Unrest)
Historical Dictionary of the Dirty Wars (Historical Dictionaries of War, Revolution, and Civil Unrest)
Historical Dictionary of the Dirty Wars (Historical Dictionaries of War, Revolution, and Civil Unrest)
Kohut David R Vilella Olga

Historical Dictionary of the Dirty Wars (Historical Dictionaries of War, Revolution, and Civil Unrest)

  • Publish Date: 2010-02-18
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • Author: David Kohut;Olga Vilella

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Unlike a conventional war waged against a standing army, a dirty war is waged against individuals, groups, or ideas considered subversive. Originally associated with Argentina's military regime from 1976-1983, the term has since been applied to neighboring dictatorships during the period. Indeed, it has become a byword for state-sponsored repression anywhere in the world. The first edition of this reference illustrated the concept by describing the regimes of Argentina, Chile (1973-1990), and Uruguay (1973-1985), which tortured, murdered, and disappeared thousands of people in the name of anticommunism while thousands more were driven into exile. The second edition expands the scope to include Bolivia (1971-1982), Brazil (1964-1985), and Paraguay (1954-1989). In mid-1975 the six countries joined forces, creating Operation Condor, a top-secret military network that hunted down one another's political enemies.

This second edition of Historical Dictionary of The Dirty Wars focuses on the period 1954-1990 in South America, when authoritarian regimes waged war on subversion, both real and imagined. This is done through a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and over 400 cross-referenced dictionary entries on the countries; guerrilla and political movements; prominent guerrilla, human-rights, military, and political figures; local, regional, and international human-rights organizations; and artistic figures (filmmakers, novelists, and playwrights) whose works attempt to represent or resist the period of repression.


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